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Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2018

Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2018

Posted in: NewsEvery year, Royal Life Saving produces a National Drowning Report. This report examines the factors that contribute to drowning deaths in Australia by examining who, where, when and how people have drowned in Australian waterways over the last year. See snapshot of key findings below or download full report.

OVERALL

  • 249 people drowned in Australian waterways between 1 July 2017 and 30 June 2018
  • This year’s figure is a 14% reduction on 2016/17 and an 11% reduction on the 10 year average of 279 drowning deaths.

 

SEX AND AGE GROUP

  • 179 (72%) drowning deaths were male
  • 70 (28%) drowning deaths were female
  • 18 (7%) drowning deaths occurred in children aged 0-4 years
  • 9 (4%) drowning deaths occurred in children aged 5-14 years
  • 29 (12%) drowning deaths occurred in young people aged 15-24 years
  • 103 (41%) drowning deaths occurred in males aged 25-64 years
  • 52 (21%) drowning deaths occurred in people aged 65 years and over

 

STATE AND TERRITORY

  • 87 (35%) drowning deaths occurred in New South Wales
  • 60 (24%) drowning deaths occurred in Queensland
  • 40 (16%) drowning deaths occurred in Victoria
  • 27 (11%) drowning deaths occurred in Western Australia

 

LOCATION AND ACTIVITY

  • 61 (24%) drowning deaths occurred at rivers, creeks and streams
  • 46 (18%) drowning deaths occurred at beaches
  • 40 (16%) drowning deaths occurred at ocean/harbour locations
  • 33 (13%) drowning deaths occurred in swimming pools
  • 63 (25%) were swimming and recreating immediately prior to drowning
  • 36 (15%) were boating immediately prior to drowning
  • 35 (14%) drowned as a result of a fall into water

 

Click here to download Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2018

 
 
Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2017

Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2017

Posted in: NewsEvery year, Royal Life Saving produces a National Drowning Report. This report examines the factors that contribute to drowning deaths in Australia by examining who, where, when and how people have drowned in Australian waterways over the last year. See snapshot of key findings below or download full report.

OVERALL

  • 291 people drowned in Australian waterways between 1 July 2016 and 30 June 2017
  • This year's figure of 281 drowning deaths is an increase of 9 drowning deaths (or 3%) on the 282 drowning deaths recoreded in 2015/16
  • This is also an increase of 10 deaths (or 4%) on the 10 year average of 281 drowning deaths

 

SEX AND AGE GROUP

  • 214 (74%) drowning deaths were male
  • 77 (26%) drowning deaths were female
  • 29 (10%) drowning deaths occurred in children aged 0-4 years
  • 12 (4%) drowning deaths occurred in children aged 5-14 years
  • 43 (15%) drowning deaths occurred in people aged 25-34 years
  • 70 (24%) drowning deaths occurred in people aged 65 years and over

 

STATE AND TERRITORY

  • 93 (32%) drowning deaths occurred in New South Wales
  • 73 (25%) drowning deaths occurred in Queensland
  • 45 (15%) drowning deaths occurred in Victoria
  • 42 (14%) drowning deaths occurred in Western Australia

 

LOCATION AND ACTIVITY

  • 68 (23%) drowning deaths occurred at rivers, creeks and streams
  • 50 (17%) drowning deaths occurred at beaches
  • 46 (16%) drowning deaths occurred in ocean / harbour locations
  • 73 (25%) were swimming and recreating immediately prior to drowning
  • 46 (16%) drowned as a result of falls into water
  • 37 (13%) were boating immediately prior to drowning

 

Click here to download Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2017

 
 
Toddler drownings in backyard pools: gates are the problem

Toddler drownings in backyard pools: gates are the problem

Posted in: NewsToddler drownings in backyard pools: gates are the problem

Faulty gates are the major cause of toddler drownings in backyard pools in Australia according to KidsAlive founder Laurie Lawrence.

KidsAlive is a drowning prevention organisation founded by Lawrence following his retirement as an Australian Olympic swimming coach almost 30 years ago.

Says Lawrence: “While we advocate our ‘Do The Five’, which is five key ways to protect toddlers around pools – fencing, gates, learning to swim, supervision and resuscitation – it’s worth bringing to people’s attention the underlying problems related to pool gates. We can do much better when it comes to safeguarding gates.”

Citing a 2015 report into backyard child drownings by a team convened and supported by the NSW Ombudsman, the soberingly-named Child Death Review Team, Laurie Lawrence said: “Part of the report explained that out of 32 fenced pools that were investigated during one period almost all had one or more faults that could potentially allow a child to access the pool area.

“Almost all of the pools had reported faults with the pool gate or latch mechanism, which, in most cases, meant that gate did not self-close. Issues included no self-closing mechanism and damaged latch mechanisms. A faulty gate or latch mechanism was identified as the child’s likely access point to the pool area in 21 cases. That’s terrible…and preventable.”

According to Lawrence, another common and annoying problem with pool gates is that they are often propped open by older children and adults, providing unauthorized toddler access to the pool area. This, he says, opens up the dangerous pool to inquisitive tots, whose entry into the pool is mostly “silent”, providing almost no notification to parents and carers.

At a media event conducted by Laurie Lawrence and KidsAlive in the Sydney suburb of Mosman on January 24, 2017, Lawrence told the assembled television and print journalists that nothing can replace adult supervision when it comes to protecting toddlers around pools. But he was quick to highlight a new Australian innovation that will contribute significantly to the safety and efficacy of pool gates.

“I’ve long been a supporter of the Australian-made MagnaLatch magnetic pool gate latch,” Lawrence said. “It was a game changer when it came out over 20 years ago, and I know it has saved many, many lives during that time. And the people behind the latch, D&D Technologies, have long been a supporter of KidsAlive and all that we do.

“But the clever people at D&D, frustrated by these ongoing issues with pool gates, have just released a MagnaLatch with built-in alarms! They’ve called it the MagnaLatch ALERT, because every time a gate is entered a single, distinctive beep sounds, notifying parents that someone is entering their pool area.

“If the gate is held open for more than 15 seconds the alarm siren will ramp up, and so the gate has to be closed – latched – to stop the alarm. I think this is a remarkable breakthrough for child safety in Australia and around the world. It’s a combined latch and alarm in one convenient unit, and it simply screws on to your gate.”

Laurie Lawrence said that with new technology being developed that will make a critical difference to pool gate safety, pool owners should take every step possible to make their backyard pool safe for all children.

He says he and other drowning prevention advocates in Australia had made great inroads into lowering backyard drownings over the past 30 years.

“Since the year 2000 toddler drownings in backyard pools in Australia have dropped from an unthinkable 63 deaths per year to 21 in 2015-16. That’s a great result, but 21 is still too many – and every one of those deaths is ultimately preventable. Twenty one kids is still a bus load of kids, and the very thought of them and their families is what drives me day in, day out.”

- ENDS -

For more information on child drowning, KidsAlive or MagnaLatch ALERT contact Laurie Lawrence on 0412 516 430

 
 
Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2016

Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2016

Posted in: NewsEvery year, Royal Life Saving produces a National Drowning Report. This report examines the factors that contribute to drowning deaths in Australia by examining who, where, when and how people have drowned in Australian waterways over the last year. See snapshot of key findings below or download full report.

OVERALL

  • 280 people drowned in Australian waterways between 1 July 2015 and 30 June 2016
  • This year's figure of 280 drowning deaths is an increase of 13 drowning deaths (or 5%) on the 267 drowning deaths recoreded in 2014/15
  • This is a reduction of 2 deaths on the 10 year average of 282 drowning deaths

 

SEX AND AGE GROUP

  • 231 (83%) drowning deaths were male
  • 49 (17%) drowning deaths were female
  • 21 (8%) drowning deaths occurred in children aged 0-4 years
  • 11 (4%) drowning deaths occurred in children aged 5-14 years
  • 52 (19%) drowning deaths occurred in people aged 25-34 years
  • 58 (21%) drowning deaths occurred in people aged 65 years and over

 

STATE AND TERRITORY

  • 96 (34%) drowning deaths occurred in New South Wales
  • 66 (24%) drowning deaths occurred in Queensland
  • 43 (15%) drowning deaths occurred in Victoria
  • 37 (13%) drowning deaths occurred in Western Australia

 

LOCATION AND ACTIVITY

  • 63 (23%) drowning deaths occurred at beaches
  • 58 (21%) drowning deaths occurred at rivers, creeks and streams
  • 53 (19%) drowning deaths occurred in ocean / harbour locations
  • 74 (26%) were swimming and recreating immediately prior to drowning
  • 46 (16%) were boating immediately prior to drowning
  • 39 (14%) drowned as a result of falls into water

 

Click here to download Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2016

 
 
World Alzheimer’s Day

World Alzheimer’s Day

Posted in: Articles,NewsWorld Alzheimer's Day is on September 21, 2016

Posted: September 14, 2016

Australian company offers an ideal aged-care facility security product.

The facts*:

  • September 21, 2016, is World Alzheimer’s Day.
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia.
  • There are about 354,000 Australians living with dementia.
  • Each week, there are more than 1,800 new cases of dementia in Australia.
  • Dementia is the second leading cause of death in Australia, and there is no cure.
  • Worldwide there are more than 46.8 million people with dementia, with 131.5 million predicted by 2050
  • Dementia is the single greatest cause of disability in older Australians aged 65 years or older

* Source: Alzheimer’s Australia

 

It’s no secret: our population is increasing, we’re living longer, and more and more of us will ultimately turn to Australia’s aged-care system, services and infrastructure for assistance in our old age.

The care and security of our ageing population has become a major priority for the aged-care system. While 3% of people aged between 65 and 74 are thought to have dementia, studies alarmingly reveal that some 43% of people in permanent residential aged care in the same age group had a diagnosis of dementia.

The Australian Government spend $14.8 billion on aged-case services during 2013-14. The care, housing and security of the elderly is proving increasingly costly and more problematic. People with dementia and Alzheimer’s in aged-care facilities and residential care become “flight risks” in that they tend to wander. Entrance, perimeter and even inter-facility security points are being challenged by dementia sufferers.

Australian company D&D Technologies, which made its name in the child gate safety business, namely swimming pool and childcare centre gates, believes it has come up with the ultimate gate latch for aged-care facilities and for home-care situations. For more than 25 years D&D has been refining and improving its renowned MagnaLatch® Magnetic Safety Gate Latch, but early in 2016 it announced the world’s first and only combined gate latch and electronic alarms– the MagnaLatch® ALERT. The MagnaLatch® ALERT comes in two models – one for child safety gates (e.g. swimming pools and childcare centres) and another model for gates around homes, aged-care facilities, yards, gardens and perimeter areas.

This new latch-alarm device offers a dual alarm system of flashing LED lights (safety you can see) and an audible alarm (safety you can hear). It’s the perfect solution for when carers can’t turn their backs for a second.

Many an elderly patient or dementia sufferer will challenge the security of their safe haven, and with this in mind the new ALERT latches are thoughtfully designed so that upon each entry or exit of a gate a single beep is heard. This notifies carers or property owners whenever someone enters or exits a gate.

If a gate is left or held open a second beep will be heard after 10 seconds. It’s only after 15 seconds of the gate being open and unlatched that the alarm siren begins to ramp up and LED lights begin to flash, providing carers and owners with visual and audible alerts, even from inside the facility or home.

Former Australian Olympic swimming coach and child water safety advocate, Laurie Lawrence, has had a long association with D&D Technologies and its Australian-made products. Says Lawrence: “I was mightily impressed with the first MagnaLatch when it came out over 20 years ago. But to see this new model of MagnaLatch ALERT, with built-in electronic alarms, represents an entirely new level of safety and peace-of-mind for homeowners, parents and carers. This is a major breakthrough for all types of safety gates.”

The best news is the ease with which the new latch-alarm system is installed. The electronic alarms are powered by an integrated, replaceable battery, so there’s no need for wiring, electricians or special tools. By simply screwing the latch onto the gate/fence the owner gains both a safety gate latch and an alarm system!

In 2015 the ground-breaking features of the MagnaLatch® ALERT were recognised with an Australian ‘Good Design Award’, now an internationally recognised award for innovative products.

In addition to all the alarm features of the new latch, and like all regular MagnaLatches, the ALERT models feature magnetically-triggered latching, key lockable security (rekeyable by a locksmith to match house doors), a visible Locked/Unlocked indicator, and a high degree of horizontal and vertical adjustment to ensure ongoing performance.

D&D Technologies’ Marketing Director, Justin Francis, says: “Not only does the MagnaLatch® ALERT notify that a gate is not closed and secure, but more importantly it warns that the gate is not properly latched. Until the latching mechanism is engaged, the alarms will flash and sound, even on fences where the gate may appear to be closed and safe. So this product is really an ‘unlatched’ alarm system, which is unique. We’re talking about what must surely be the safest gate latch in the world.”

The two models of the new MagnaLatch® ALERT are the tall ‘Top Pull’ model for swimming pool and other child safety gates, and the shorter ‘Vertical Pull’ model for front, side, perimeter and pet gates.

All product mounting screws, instructions, alarm battery and an Owner’s Manual are supplied standard.

The MagnaLatch® ALERT is available at Bunnings, other good hardware stores, or your local fencing contractor. SRP $195.


 
D&D Technologies is fully Australian owned, and all products are Australian made. All of D&D’s high-tech gate hardware latches and hinges carry a Lifetime Warranty. The electronic alarm unit of the MagnaLatch® ALERT carries a 2-Year Warranty.

For technical product information contact D&D Technologies (02) 9454 7888, or at sales@ddtech.com.au. Or visit http://au.ddtechglobal.com/
 

Further media enquiries:
Contact Justin Francis or Phil Doyle at D&D Technologies Pty Ltd. 
Phone (02) 9454 7800 or 0413 834 105. Or email jfrancis@ddgroup.com.au
 
 
 

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